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Posted on 23rd Jul at 5:52 PM, with 89 notes
letterstomycountry:

When you see something like this, it’s hard not to wonder whose protection this is actually for: journalists, or the Israeli Government.  One of the reasons that the Vietnam War generated so much political opposition at home was because it was really the first war where images of war-related destruction and casualties were televised to the American people in real time.  It’s amazing how quickly people stop supporting war when the results of it are shoved in their face.  Conversely, one of the quickest ways to stifle opposition to war is to hide its results.  That’s part of the reason why the Bush I administration refused to allow the coffins of dead soldiers to be photographed, a tradition that Clinton and GWB upheld.  Out of sight, of mind.
JVP

letterstomycountry:

When you see something like this, it’s hard not to wonder whose protection this is actually for: journalists, or the Israeli Government.  One of the reasons that the Vietnam War generated so much political opposition at home was because it was really the first war where images of war-related destruction and casualties were televised to the American people in real time.  It’s amazing how quickly people stop supporting war when the results of it are shoved in their face.  Conversely, one of the quickest ways to stifle opposition to war is to hide its results.  That’s part of the reason why the Bush I administration refused to allow the coffins of dead soldiers to be photographed, a tradition that Clinton and GWB upheld.  Out of sight, of mind.

JVP

Posted on 23rd Jul at 12:24 PM, with 1,329,544 notes
ronpaulproblems:

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:


nateriot:

Obama on gay adoption 


yeah totally ruining this country what a horrible guy


"Obama said pretty words, guys. Ignore all that he’s done over the past 6 years and look at this fancy tweet. He’s chill."

ronpaulproblems:

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

nateriot:

Obama on gay adoption 

image

yeah totally ruining this country what a horrible guy

"Obama said pretty words, guys. Ignore all that he’s done over the past 6 years and look at this fancy tweet. He’s chill."

Posted on 23rd Jul at 1:15 AM, with 747 notes
ladygolem:

hestmord:

gloomgaze:

the internet is an astounding, baffling place

Fucking is a foreign substance

Half Life 3 Confirmed

ladygolem:

hestmord:

gloomgaze:

the internet is an astounding, baffling place

Fucking is a foreign substance

Half Life 3 Confirmed

Posted on 23rd Jul at 1:14 AM, with 950 notes
ronpaulproblems:

proudgayconservative:

stoppity:

americas-liberty:

Obama posted this on Twitter. The pay gap myth aside… we didn’t land on the moon until 1969. You’d think the White House would at least do a little research on, you know, American history.

Oh my god, I can’t believe this.

good grief. 

lol

ronpaulproblems:

proudgayconservative:

stoppity:

americas-liberty:

Obama posted this on Twitter. The pay gap myth aside… we didn’t land on the moon until 1969. You’d think the White House would at least do a little research on, you know, American history.

Oh my god, I can’t believe this.

good grief. 

lol

Posted on 22nd Jul at 4:52 AM, with 191 notes

ronpaulproblems:

rtrixie:

I don’t have all of these, but that should make for a good laugh. 

Uhhh

Posted on 21st Jul at 2:03 AM, with 88 notes
letterstomycountry:

Caption via A Mighty Girl:

The three women pictured in this incredible photograph from 1885 — Anandibai Joshi of India, Keiko Okami of Japan, and Sabat Islambouli of Syria — each became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries. The three were students at the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; one of the only places in the world at the time where women could study medicine.As Mallika Rao writes in HuffPost, “If the timing doesn’t seem quite right, that’s understandable. In 1885, women in the U.S. still couldn’t vote, nor were they encouraged to learn very much. Popular wisdom decreed that studying was a threat to motherhood.” Given this, how did three women from around the world end up studying there to become doctors? The credit, according to Christopher Woolf of PRI’s The World, goes to the Quakers who “believed in women’s rights enough to set up the WMCP way back in 1850 in Germantown.”Woolf added, “It was the first women’s medical college in the world, and immediately began attracting foreign students unable to study medicine in their home countries. First they came from elsewhere in North America and Europe, and then from further afield. Women, like Joshi in India and Keiko Okami in Japan, heard about WMCP, and defied expectations of society and family to travel independently to America to apply, then figure out how to pay for their tuition and board… . Besides the international students, it also produced the nation’s first Native American woman doctor, Susan LeFlesche, while African Americans were often students as well. Some of whom, like Eliza Grier, were former slaves.”To read more about these women’s stories, check out the HuffPost article at http://huff.to/1egiYwT or listen to the PRI story at http://bit.ly/Q6TjLA

letterstomycountry:

Caption via A Mighty Girl:

The three women pictured in this incredible photograph from 1885 — Anandibai Joshi of India, Keiko Okami of Japan, and Sabat Islambouli of Syria — each became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries. The three were students at the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania; one of the only places in the world at the time where women could study medicine.

As Mallika Rao writes in HuffPost, “If the timing doesn’t seem quite right, that’s understandable. In 1885, women in the U.S. still couldn’t vote, nor were they encouraged to learn very much. Popular wisdom decreed that studying was a threat to motherhood.” Given this, how did three women from around the world end up studying there to become doctors? The credit, according to Christopher Woolf of PRI’s The World, goes to the Quakers who “believed in women’s rights enough to set up the WMCP way back in 1850 in Germantown.”

Woolf added, “It was the first women’s medical college in the world, and immediately began attracting foreign students unable to study medicine in their home countries. First they came from elsewhere in North America and Europe, and then from further afield. Women, like Joshi in India and Keiko Okami in Japan, heard about WMCP, and defied expectations of society and family to travel independently to America to apply, then figure out how to pay for their tuition and board… . Besides the international students, it also produced the nation’s first Native American woman doctor, Susan LeFlesche, while African Americans were often students as well. Some of whom, like Eliza Grier, were former slaves.”

To read more about these women’s stories, check out the HuffPost article at http://huff.to/1egiYwT or listen to the PRI story at http://bit.ly/Q6TjLA

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